Petrarka

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What is the Petrarka font?

Petrarka may be described as a Condensed, Sans-Serif, Semi-Fatface Roman. Huh? Bear with me on this. The Fatface is a name given to the popular nineteenth-century romans that where characterized by an extremity of contrast between the thick and thin stroke. The earliest example that is generally familiar is Thorowgood, believed to have been designed by Robert Thorne and released by Thorowgood Foundry in 1820 as “Five-line Pica No. 5.” Copied by many foundries, it became one of the more popular advertising types of the day. Later, in the period from about 1890 to 1950, you find a number of typeface designs with the thin stroke beefed up a bit, not quite so extreme. What you might call Semi-Fatfaced Romans begin to replace the extreme Fatfaces. Serifed designs like Bauer’s Bernard Roman Extra Bold and ATF’s Bold Antique appear. In addition, we see the development of semi-fatface lineals or Sans-Serif Semi-Fatfaces. Examples include Britannic (Stephenson Blake), Chambord Bold (Olive), Koloss (Ludwig & Mayer), Matthews (ATF) and Radiant Heavy (Ludlow). Petrarka has much in common with this latter group, but is distinguished by two salient features: it is condensed and it shows a strong blackletter influence, as seen in the ‘H’ particularly. More…
Petrark was released about 1900 by the German foundry of Schelter & Giesecke of Leipzig and is one of the designs of the period that attempts to reconcile roman and blackletter traditions.
Making a cameo appearance in this Multi-Lingual font is the Anglo-Saxon letter yogh (#729), which, along with the thorn and the eth, is always useful for preparing flyers in Old English. There are still pockets of resistance to the Norman French influence that washed up on England’s shores in 1066. This font stands with King Canute, seeking to hold back the tide (ignoring the fact that Canute was a Dane). Support the fight to preserve Anglo-Saxon culture. Buy Petrarka ML today.
Petrarka Initials brings together the Petrarka upper case letters with a very sympatico Art Nouveau rendering of a female face.

Petrarka Font families

The Petrarka font includes the following font families:

  • Petrarka ML
  • Petrarka Initials SC

Petrarka Preview

Here is a preview of how Petrarka will look. For more previews using your own text as an example, click here.


Are you looking for a free download of Petrarka? Most of the fonts on MartinWaitFonts.com are premium, which means Petrarka is not a free font.

You won't find Petrarka as a free download, so I would advise you just to go ahead and pay for it and download Petrarka HERE. You can find some other great options here on MartinWaitFonts.com as well that will save you time looking around all over the web.

It is always best to pay for a premium font rather than trying to find an illegal download. The benefits of paying for Petrarka are that you get the license, and if you're caught using it illegally there could be some potential legal implications with the publisher of this particular typeface.

Furthermore, when searching "free downloads" on Google, most websites will say they have them but these types of offers usually come at a cost - either something like high-pressure sales tactics or getting tricked into downloading malware onto your computer by malicious third parties who want access to all your personal information!

It's just too risky going about finding free fonts online.

If you really want Petrarka and you want to truly own it the legal and safe way, then click here to visit the download and purchase page on MyFonts.com. Here you will be able to obtain the proper license. The designer and publisher deserves to be paid for their work, as they have put in the hours and the creativity to produce such an amazing font. Good luck with your purchase and future use of this font. :)